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How I Cured Morgellons

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Laura

5/15/2019
9:54:50 AM

Dear Linda,

As I read you post, it made me think of how important it is to be good to our skin. One thing that has helped me with the bumps that appear or the small lesions is rubbing liquid stevia on it and leaving it alone.

The following information is from the "Organic Facts Health" website. "Stevia leaves contain various vitamins and minerals, like vitamin C and A, rutin, zinc, magnesium and iron. The stevia leaf is also rich in antioxidants, which helps to safeguard the body from free-radical damage as a result of metabolic and environmental factors. A particular enzyme present in the leaf, called superoxide dismutast, may also help to inhibit cancer cell growth."

I encourage everyone to be good to your skin and continue to treat this disease from the inside out. What we put in our mouths is more important than what we put on our skin. Mel has often shared as we get better on the inside, the outside also gets better.

I pray for everyone to remember it is a slow and steady process. However, there is hope and life after MD.

“What strength do I have, that I should still hope? What prospects, that I should be patient?" Job 6:11

In Christ Love,
Laure

Jamie

5/13/2019
8:28:03 PM
I'll SAY IT AGAIN, JUST COLD WATER AND LOGOS BASIC PROTOCOL AND YOU TOO CAN HAVE GREAT HAIR AT 73!

Oh, the hair issue!

This is my favorite part of Morgellons (please sense the sarcasm!).

I thought I’d weigh in because I have spent SO much time and SO much money on my hair. My husband calls me the shampoo junkie, and he’s pretty correct about that.

I think everyone experiences Morgellons and Lyme differently, so I don’t pretend to know the answer. I’ll just relay my experiences.

There are a lot of days when I threaten to shave it all off, but I don’t. In the beginning, I had significant hair loss, but over time, that has majorly stabilized. In fact, my hair has gradually gotten fuller by degrees, but it is no where near what it once was. It may never be. I had to learn to accept that, for now, it is what it is.

For the past three years, my hair has been entirely coated with a waxy substance that I now believe to be biofilm—I concur with Karen. When my hair is dry, the average person cannot tell, but when my hair is wet, I can feel and see the difference from what it once was. Gone are the days of a “precision” haircut. The ends of my hair, if not trimmed every four weeks, start to look “ragged.”

#1 Tip: Keep your hair as short as you can tolerate it. I think this is way easier for the average man since a buzz cut is so common. Hair is tied to most women’s identities. Keeping your hair short makes it easier to comb through and manage. It gives the little critters less to infest.

#2: Kleen Green. It really does help with the creepy crawlies. When I spray it on my hair, the sensations immediately dissipate. My hair used to move on its own. Nothing dramatic, but when it first started happening, I honestly didn’t know what to think. Kleen Green seems to stop that kind of movement, too. It has not eliminated the biofilm issue, though. I also find that if I use it too often, it can make my very fine and thin hair feel rather dry.

#3: Magnifizyme. I have started, at Karen’s suggestion, to empty a capsule into my shampoo or conditioner. I have found that I can’t really use it every single day. Not sure why. I don’t leave my shampoo on for a lengthy period of time, so I’m not sure how effective that is if I rinse it off a minute or two later, but I like using it with conditioner and wrapping my head overnight. That seems to work best.

#4: Cold water. I wash my hair with warm/mildly hot water to open the pores. I then tip my head back into freezing cold water to rinse. That closes the pores. Although I still have the biofilm problem, the cold water is soothing to my scalp, even though I don’t have lesions there. Even my hair dresser tells me that cold water is good to seal the cuticle.

#5: I use a boar’s hair brush (that I spray with Kleen Green to clean) to give my hair extra elevation when I blow dry it. I use minimal hairspray. If I don’t use something, my hair looks hideous, and I am in front of teenagers every day. Other than that, I always use a wide-tooth comb. The Morgellons makes it really hard to blow dry hair. My hair has so little body, and the Morgellons makes the brush “catch” or something when I blow dry. It’s hard to explain. I can’t air dry it and go out in public without a hat, however, which is a challenge.

#6: I try not to wash my hair every single day, but overnight, I find that the critters use my hair as their playground. I often wake up looking like Alfalfa. Water washing is an option on days when you don’t want to wash but need to look presentable.

#7: I’ve tried so many shampoos, seriously, and I’ve read about so many shampoos on the forum. I think mixing it up helps...not allowing them to get used to one thing. I still haven’t decided whether all-natural or medicated shampoos work better. I can attest that one of the best natural shampoos on the market is Belegenza, which you can get online. I know the owner, and he is amazingly responsible about product ingredients. His shampoos are food-grade. None of the shampoos I have ever tried have broken through the unbelievably stubborn biofilm, however.

#8: I find that conditioners tend to “sit” on my hair and don’t get absorbed. I find coconut oil to be simply exasperating on my fine hair, but I know that other people swear by it. On the other hand, I LOVE coconut oil on my skin, and I have thrown away all other skin products other than that. On the hair, though, it takes forever to wash it out, and my hair looks super oily until it is all out. I’ve started mixing black seed oil (a natural antioxidant) with my shampoo, and I like that much better. I can’t use it every day, but every third day or so it works as a good conditioner. That was Maria’s idea.

#9: Other than a few stray lesions, headaches, and fatigue, the first real Morgellons symptom (when I knew three years ago that I was in trouble) was my hair loss and texture change. I think my hair will be the last part of my body to heal. Hair is expendable, and the body knows it. I predict that my scalp and hair will be the location of “Custer’s Last Stand” when I finally rid myself of the Morgellons. I predict that I will wage war with it there until the bitter end.

#10: Most importantly, and I am sure Mel would agree, is treating my insides with the protocol. When my insides are healthy, the outside healing will happen as well.

That’s way more than probably any of you actually wanted to read, but I have been battling the hair issue for three long years. I’ve learned a thing of two, I suppose.

Jamie


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